WPBT2's Star Gazers

Episode #12-25 "What the Stars Look Like During the First Days of Summer!"
Air Dates June 18 - June 24, 2012



FIVE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
JAMES: Welcome to Star Gazers. I'm James Albury.

MARLENE: And I'm Marlene Hidalgo.

DEAN: And I'm Dean Regas, and we're here to help you be sure you know what you're seeing in the night sky when you look up.

JAMES: This Wednesday, June 20th, summer officially begins in the northern hemisphere at 7:09 pm., eastern daylight time which means that at that precise moment our star, the sun, will reach its northernmost point above the celestial equator. And for most people in the northern hemisphere the hours of daylight will be longest and the hours of night shortest.

DEAN:  Now I know the sun sets really late and even though there will be fewer hours to star gaze on the first nights of summer, you'll still find them spectacular as one season begins and another ends.  And plus, it'll be warmer out there at night.

MARLENE: Wondering what we're talking about? Lets show you!

(STOP & DROP)

MARLENE: OK, we've got our skies set up for any night next week, just after sunset facing west where you'll be able to see 2 planets high in the southwest, Mars and Saturn.  Mars is on its way toward a close encounter with Saturn in late July, early August.

JAMES:  And, if you happen to be an early bird like Dean, you can catch the two brightest planets Jupiter and Venus as they join each other in Taurus the bull.  They'll form a nice pairing in the east just before sunrise.

MARLENE:  But Mars, Saturn, Jupiter and Venus are planets which come and go and appear in various seasons throughout the year. What we want to show you is the stars that you'll be able to see during the first nights of summer, for every summer, as long as you live.

DEAN: So, after sunset, if you simply look over to the right of Mars, you'll see one of the most famous constellations of spring, Leo the Lion. In fact, if you remember a few months ago, Mars was near the center of Leo and very close to Regulus, the brightest star in Leo. However, because the earth and Mars revolve around the sun, Mars has appeared to leave Leo and is now heading into the constellation of Virgo the Virgin. Here it will be joining Saturn for an exquisite triangular conjunction with the star Spica in late July - early August.

MARLENE: Let's go over how to find Saturn again. To find it, simply use our handy arc to Arcturus and speed on to Saturn trick.
If you look toward the northwest, you'll see the Big Dipper. Trace an arrow through its handle and continue that arc to the bright star Arcturus, the brightest star in Bootes the Herdsman. Then, continue that line toward the west where you'll encounter beautiful Saturn.

JAMES: And as you regular star gazers may recall, on the first nights of spring, just after sunset, Leo was on the opposite side of the sky, just rising in the east. So now on the first nights of summer it is quite appropriate that Leo is exactly opposite where he was on the first nights of spring and is getting ready to leave the heavens and set in the west.

(STOP AND DROP)

DEAN: Now, if we follow this chain of thought a little farther we could surmise that just after sunset on the first nights of summer, any bright stars we see rising in the east should be the stars which will stay with us all summer long. So, we call these the summer stars and constellations.

MARLENE: Lets turn ourselves 180 degrees so that we are now looking opposite Leo, toward the east and voila! Without any trouble we can easily see 3 extremely bright stars, which if we draw lines between them, form a gigantic triangle, a triangle which -- not coincidentally -- is called… what else? The Summer Triangle.

JAMES: In fact, on the first nights of every summer, for the rest of your life, if you go outside just after sunset and look east, this cosmic triangle will always be in the same place, rising in the east and brightly announcing that it will be in the heavens all summer long, every summer of your life.

DEAN: How poetic. The stars which are rising in the east in early evening on the first nights of any season will be the same ones getting ready to set in the west in early evening at the beginning of the next season.

MARLENE: So get outside, star gazers and welcome summer's triangle…

JAMES: And say farewell to the Lion of spring…

DEAN: And remember, whatever you do…

ALL: Keep looking up!!

 

Episode #12-25 "What the Stars Look Like During the First Days of Summer!"
Air Dates June 18 - June 24, 2012



ONE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
JAMES: This Wednesday, June 20th, summer officially begins in the northern hemisphere.

DEAN: And even though there will be fewer hours to star gaze on the first nights of summer, you'll still find them beautiful  as they herald the beginning of the new season and the end of the old. Let's show you.

(STOP & DROP)

JAMES: OK, we've got our skies set up for any night this week, just after sunset facing west, where you'll be able to see the springtime constellation, Leo the Lion. If you remember, on the first nights of spring, Leo was on the opposite side of the sky, just after sunset. On the first nights of summer, its fitting that Leo is opposite where he was on the first nights of spring and is getting ready to leave the heavens and set in the west.

DEAN: Now, if we turn ourselves 180 degrees, and face east, we can easily see 3 bright stars, which form the summer triangle - one of the most beloved star groupings of the season

.BOTH: Keep looking up!

 

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