WPBT2's Star Gazers

Episode #12-30 "Transient Triangles And Orion Rises Once More"
Air Dates July 23 - July 29, 2012



FIVE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
MARLENE: Welcome to Star Gazers. Iím Marlene Hidalgo andÖ

JAMES: Iím James Albury,

DEAN: And Iím Dean Regas,

DEAN: Weíre here to help you be sure you know what youíre seeing in the night sky when you...

TRIO: Look up.†

MARLENE. This week weíre going to tell you all about two temporary triangles in the sky; one at night and one in the morning.

JAMES: Plus winterís Orion the hunter reappears in the morning sky.

DEAN: Letís show you.

(STOP AND DROP)

MARLENE: Weíre going to begin by looking into the southwest sky about an hour after sunset, where you should have no problem spotting a fairly bright triangle of lights in the evening sky about 20 degrees above the horizon.

DEAN: The brightest of the three is the one on top. Anyone care to guess who that might be? Iíll give you a hint. Itís an ear-y sight (holds hands by ears). Yeah, I know the hint was corny, but you got it, right? Yep, thatís the planet with ears, 75,000-mile wide Saturn. The first astronomer to look at Saturn using a telescope, Galileo, described it as looking like it had ears.

JAMES: Down to the right of Saturn is another planet, the red planet Mars. Mars has been exceptionally bright for the past few months, but itís slowly fading now as itís getting about half a million miles farther from us every day. Mars is the planet to watch over the next few weeks because our triangle will rapidly change shape as the nights go by.

MARLENE: The last member of our triangle is the star Spica. Spica is the brightest star in Virgo and itís the most distant object in our triangle. The light you see from Spica has taken over 260 years to get here from the star so you can see Spica in the sky. By comparison, Saturnís light takes about an hour and twenty minutes to get here while the light from Mars only has a thirteen minute trip.

DEAN: Now the special thing about our triangle is that itís very temporary, it wonít last long. If you watch every night for the next two weeks youíll see it collapse to a nearly straight line but Öthen it will re-form as Mars keeps on moving. By the end of August the triangle will be lower in the sky and Mars will be about 16 million miles farther away. So really, Spica and Saturn will pretty much sit still while they watch Mars zip through them.

MARLENE: Now letís go to Deanís favorite time to star gaze, just before dawn. Weíre going to look into the east a good hour before sunrise and there will be two blazing planets and a bright star making another good triangle to greet the dawn. The brightest of the three is Venus. She is the brightest thing in the sky after the sun and moon. She reflects a lot of the light she gets from the sun and is quite close to us. Venusí light takes less than five minutes to get across space to the earth.

JAMES: The second brightest member of our morning triangle is Jupiter. Jupiter is a lot bigger than Venus but Jupiter is also a lot farther away. Remember Marlene said that Venus is about 5 light minutes away? Well Jupiter is about 9 times farther away. It takes the light from Jupiter about 45 minutes to get here.

DEAN: The last member of our morning triangle is Aldebaran, the bright red star that marks the eye of Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran is just a bit brighter than Spica but it wonít look as bright in this morning triangle as Spica did because Venus and Jupiter are loads brighter than Mars and Saturn. Iíd like to call your attention to a familiar star pattern just below this morning triangle. The dominant pattern of winter skies, Orion is making his reappearance in the morning sky. The two bright stars Betelgeuse and Rigel will be the easiest to find with the three stars marking his belt just a bit fainter.

MARLENE: Orion will be a bit higher each morning at the same time. If you watch carefully you may notice that the star gets to the same point in the sky about four minutes earlier each day. This is what causes the slow seasonal change to the constellations.

JAMES: So letís take a quick look back at the evening sky. Mars, Saturn and Spica in the southwest after sunset.

DEAN: Venus, Jupiter and Aldebaran in the morning with Orion just below them

MARLENE: Lots of moving and changing shapes in the sky as youÖ

TRIO: Keep looking up!

 

 

Episode #12-30 "Transient Triangles And Orion Rises Once More"
Air Dates July 23 - July 29, 2012



ONE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
MARLENE: This week weíre going to tell you all about two temporary triangles in the sky.

JAMES: Plus winterís Orion the Hunter reappears in the morning sky.

BOTH: Letís show you.

(STOP AND DROP)

MARLENE: Weíll begin by looking into the southwest about an hour after sunset, where you should easily spot a bright triangle of lights.

JAMES: The brightest of the three is 75,000 mile wide Saturn. Down to the right of Saturn is another planet, the red planet Mars.

MARLENE: The last member of our triangle is the star Spica. Spica is the brightest star in Virgo and itís the most distant object in our triangle.

MARLENE: Look into the east a good hour before sunrise and there will be two blazing planets and a bright star making another good triangle. The brightest of the three is Venus.

JAMES: The second brightest member of our morning triangle is Jupiter. And the last member of our triangle is Aldebaran notice a familiar star pattern just below. Orion with the two bright stars Betelgeuse and Rigel will be reappearing in your morning sky.

TRIO: Keep looking up!

 

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