WPBT2's Star Gazers

Episode #12-42 "Ares Meets Antares and Hold Your Pinky Over the Moon"
Air Dates October 15 - October 21, 2012



FIVE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
MARLENE: Hey there Star Gazers. Iím Marlene hidalgo from Miami Florida.

JAMES: And Iím James Albury, from Gainesville, Florida.

DEAN:† And Iím Dean Regas from Cincinnati, Ohio

DEAN: Next week, one of my favorite sky goodies will happen when the red planet Mars meets its rival the red star Antares which will give us all the opportunity to see with our own eyes why our ancient ancestors considered Antares to be Mars' equal and rival.

MARLENE: You see the ancient Romans named the planet Mars for their mythical god of war but they called the star Antares "Marti Comparatur", which means "comparable to or the equivalent of Mars".

DEAN: The ancient Greeks however, called the planet Mars "Ares" after their god of war, thus the starís name was 'Antares,' and we still use it today. Antares literally means "anti, opposed to, or rivaling Mars". And frankly, I much prefer the Greek name Antares to the Roman "Marti Comparatur".

JAMES: So letís show you how to find and compare Mars with its wonderful rival.

JAMES: O.K., We've got our skies set up for Monday October 22nd, just after sunset facing southwest where you will see the giant fish hook shaped group of stars we call the Scorpion and right where the heart of the Scorpion should be is a very bright red star, the star Antares.

MARLENE: But right now Antares has a visitor, because just above it is the red planet Mars, less than four degrees away, which is equivalent to about eight full moons lined up side by side. Now whenever Mars came close to the Scorpion's heart in the past, about every two years, our ancestors couldnít help but notice that the heart star was almost identical in brightness and in color to Mars, kind of a reddish ruby-orange gold. And eventually the Greek name for the red star became the official name 'Antares', the rival of Mars.

DEAN: Now although our ancestors thought Mars was a much more important object than Antares, so important that they named it after their god of war because of its bloody red color, today we know that Antares is far more significant. You see, Mars is nothing more than a very close, very tiny 4,000 mile wide planet, only half the size of our earth. But Antares is a very distant and very big star, 600 million miles wide which means that we could line 143,000 Mars side by side across Antares' middle. The rival of Mars? I donít think so, maybe in color only.

JAMES: †Mars isnít even as bright as antares this go round. Sometimes it can match Antares and occasionally far surpass it, but not this time. In fact, Mars and its rival will not be this close again until September of the year 2014. At any rate, you can watch Mars move away from Antares the next week or so until Antares will be lost in the glare of the setting sun.

MARLENE: Mars will remain visible in the evening sky for the rest of the year and will rapidly leave the scorpion behind. Halloween is coming up soon, and one of the recurring Halloween myths has to do with the full moon on Halloween. How many Halloween illustrations have you seen with a witch flying across the full moon? Loads of them Iíll bet but like most things that everybody knows, theyíre no necessarily so.

DEAN: Halloween and the full moon are not linked. in fact the next Halloween with a full moon wonít happen until 2020. Another recurring moon myth is that the full moon is always a huge enormous bright ball in the sky. Bright it may be but big it is not.

JAMES: We want you to give this moon myth the famous Albury, Hidalgo, Regas pinkie test. Hold you favorite pinky, left or right makes no difference, out at armís length and place it over the full moon in the sky and look at it with your favorite eye, only one eye and only one pinkie, please.

MARLENE: What do you think will happen? Will your pinkie be dwarfed by the humongous moon? Some of you star gazers know the answer, but let everybody find out on their own. There is a great full moon coming up on October 28th two days before Halloween. Give it try and let us know what you find out.

DEAN: †So get out next Monday to see Mars and Antares for yourself, and put your pinkie over the moon. Theyíre yours for the seeing if youÖ

THREE: Keep looking up!

 

Episode #12-42 "Ares Meets Antares and Hold Your Pinky Over the Moon"
Air Dates October 15 - October 21, 2012



ONE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
DEAN: Next week one of my favorite sky goodies will happen when the red planet Mars meets its rival the red star Antares.

MARLENE: This will give us all the opportunity to see with our own eyes why our ancient ancestors considered Antares to be Mars' equal and rival.

STOP

DEAN: Our skies are set up for Monday October 22nd, just after sunset facing southwest where you will see the scorpion and its red heart, the star Antares.

MARLENE: But right now Antares has a visitor. Just above it is the red planet Mars,

DEAN: Now whenever Mars came close to the scorpion's heart in the past, about every two years, our ancestors couldnít help but notice that the heart star was almost identical in brightness and in color to Mars, kind of a reddish ruby- orange gold. And eventually the Greek name for the red star became the official name 'Antares', the rival of Mars.

BOTH: Keep looking up!

 

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