WPBT2's Star Gazers

Episode #12-51 "The Moon of the Short Shadows"
Air Dates December 17 - December 23, 2012



FIVE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
JAMES: Hey there Star Gazers. Iím James Albury,

DEAN: And Iím Dean Regas,

MARLENE: And Iím Marlene Hidalgo. We have a special treat for you on Christmas night as a nearly full moon will be super close to the giant planet Jupiter in the eastern sky after sunset.

JAMES: If you were gifted with a new telescope hereís a great chance to try it out. Letís go outside and take a look.

STOP AND DROP

DEAN: The moon is about the easiest sky object to find because itís so big and so bright. Be sure to use the lowest magnification until you get used to how your new scope works and after you start feeling a little more confident, increase the magnification and check out some of the craters on the moonís surface.

JAMES: Be sure to look at the terminator on the moon, thatís the edge of night and day and is the best place to see features on the surface of the moon. Then switch over to Jupiter and see its four moons. There will be two moons on each side of Jupiter on Christmas night and the great red spot will come into view after 9 oíclock. Get out and watch Jupiter every night and youíll see the moon steadily move farther away from it each night.

DEAN: Then get ready for the Full Moon of December, which occurs Friday the 28th. Now many civilizations have named each Full Moon, for things, which to them seemed peculiar or special about a particular Full Moon.

MARLENE: For instance we all know that the Harvest Moon was so named because it came at the traditional time of harvest in mid-European latitudes. Conversely the Full Moon of May was called the Planting Moon. So what so you think the Full Moon of December should be called?

JAMES: The Christmas Moon?

DEAN: The Long Underwear Moon?

JAMES: Perhaps The Plastic Moon for all the over-extended credit cards at this time of year? †

MARLENE: No, it's not called any of these, But equally appropriate is one of its other names, The Long Night Moon because it occurs so close to the Winter Solstice, the First Day of Winter. Because we all know that on the Winter Solstice days are shortest and nights are longest; Long Night Moon.

DEAN: But we could give this moon yet another name which would further describe its uniqueness: The Moon of †the Short Shadows. Letís explain:

STOP DROP

JAMES: OK, we've got our skies set up for the third week of June, the First day of Summer, The Summer Solstice and if we could speed up time and dim the Sun down so we could watch it all day long we would see that from sunrise to sunset it takes an extremely high path across the sky.

DEAN: But if we watched the Full Moon of June all night long from moonrise to moonset we would notice that it takes an extremely low path across the sky. In fact the Full Moon closest to the Summer Solstice is the lowest riding Full Moon of the year, and if you've ever been outside under the Full Moon of June, far from city lights you've probably noticed that the June Full Moon casts very long shadows. In fact, I remember as a kid walking under a June Moon and watching my long shadow stretch out in front of me.

MARLENE: So we have a situation in summer where the summer sun rides high across the sky but the Summer Full Moon rides low. And guess what? You've got it. Just the opposite occurs at the Winter Solstice.

DEAN: At the Winter Solstice the Sun takes an extremely low path across the sky and the Full Moon a very high one. Indeed, the highest path of any Full Moon of the year which makes everybody's shadow extremely short. If you don't believe me, see for yourself. Go outside this weekend around midnight when the Moon is at its very highest and see just how short your Moon shadow really is. And do you know why we can see the Full Moon longer in winter than we can in summer? Simple. Nights are longer in winter.

JAMES: So get outside Christmas night and see the moon pass really close to Jupiter

MARLENE: And the Full Moon on the 28th will be at its highest for the year and your Moon shadow will be at its shortest. Isn't it fun toÖ

THREE: Keep looking up!

 

Episode #12-51 "The Moon of the Short Shadows"
Air Dates December 17 - December 23, 2012



ONE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
DEAN: We have a special treat for you on Christmas night as a nearly full moon will be super close to the giant planet Jupiter in the eastern sky after sunset.

MARLENE: If you were gifted with a new telescope hereís a great chance to try it out. Letís go outside and take a look.

STOP AND DROP

DEAN: The moon is about the easiest sky object to find because itís so big and so bright. be sure to use the lowest magnification until you get used to how your new scope works and after you start feeling a little more confident, increase the magnification and check out some of the craters on the moonís surface.

MARLENE: Then switch over to Jupiter and see its four moons. There will be two moons on each side of Jupiter on Christmas night and the great red spot will come into view after 9 oíclock. Get out and watch Jupiter every night and youíll see the moon steadily move farther away from it each night.

BOTH: Keep looking up!

 

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