WPBT2's Star Gazers

Episode #13-01 "The Changing Stars When You Head South Or North"
Air Dates January 7, 2013 - January 13, 2013



FIVE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
DEAN: Hey there Star Gazers. I'm Dean Regas, astronomer for the Cincinnati Observatory.

JAMES: And I'm James Albury, director of the Kika Silva Pla Planetarium in Gainesville, Florida. We're here to help you find your way around the sky tonight. Welcome to south Florida, Dean.

DEAN: Thanks James. I'm always happy to travel south (especially in January) to film Star Gazers. Not only is it warmer than Cincinnati, but I get to see some new stars. Stars I can't see from up north.

JAMES: I know. We're just below the 26th parallel here in North Miami and that gives us a different perspective on the heavens.

DEAN: Let's take you with us on a trip from Cincinnati to Miami to…how's Hawaii this time of year?

JAMES: Beautiful. Let's show you!

STOP AND DROP

JAMES: Okay we have our sky set to any night this week at the latitude of Cincinnati, Ohio, 39 degrees north. Your perspective on the stars doesn't change when you travel east and west - just the time you see stuff. That means that everyone within a few degrees of this latitude sees the same stars - from New York to San Francisco - Japan to Central Asia - and even Southern Europe and North Africa have pretty much the same view.

DEAN: We're facing south at 10 p.m. where you can easily find the belted one, Orion the hunter. Look for the three stars in a row and you've found his belt. Bright, blue Rigel is the star marking his left foot while redder Betelgeuse is Orion's armpit.

JAMES: Now, use the belt stars as pointers. Shoot a line through them to the left and if you keep going you can't miss the brightest star in the sky - Sirius the scorcher!

DEAN: Sirius is the bright nose of Canis Major, the big dog of Orion and it's always kinda low in the southern sky from my latitude - but let's see the difference from down in Miami.

(STOP)

(DEAN WALKING DOWN THE GLOBE)

JAMES: When dean comes to Miami to film star gazers he's travelling down the curve of the earth. So when he heads south, he gets to see stars that were blocked by his southern horizon in Cincinnati. For every one degree of latitude dean goes south, he'll get to see one extra degree of the southern sky.

(STOP)

DEAN: So now we're looking at the same southern sky, same time, but from 26 degrees north latitude. Notice that Orion and Sirius are much higher in the sky.

JAMES: 13 degrees higher.

DEAN: And look at the southern horizon. New stars! Since I travelled 13 degrees down the globe, i can see 13 degrees more of the southern sky.

JAMES: That bright star lower in the south is called Canopus and it's the second brightest star in the entire sky - behind Sirius. But you can only see it if you're south of the 30th parallel.

DEAN: I always love seeing Canopus when I'm in Miami. It's a part of a huge southern constellation called Carina…which is part of the boat, Argo. For mythology lovers,
That's the boat that took Jason and the Argonauts on their quest for the golden fleece.

(STOP)

(DEAN AND JAMES WALKING DOWN THE GLOBE)

DEAN: Now we're heading to the big island of Hawaii and the observatories at Mauna Kea. I know that we're mostly traveling west but more importantly we're also heading south, to just below the 20th parallel.

JAMES: So we'll be six degrees farther south on the globe - so we can see 6 extra degrees of the southern sky.

(STOP)

JAMES: After dark, Orion is almost straight overhead. Sirius and Canopus are up six degrees higher too.

DEAN: But for the real treat…let's move time forward to just before sunrise. Look low in the south in the pre-dawn winter, Hawaiian sky and you'll find the southern cross, one of the most beautiful little constellations there is.

JAMES: Something I can barely see from Miami.

DEAN: And I definitely can't see in Cincinnati.

(STOP)

DEAN: Of course your view on the northern sky changes as well. In Cincinnati, Polaris, aka the North Star is 39 degrees above the horizon…

JAMES: In Miami it's 26 degrees above the horizon…

DEAN: And on Mauna Kea, Hawaii it's only 20 degrees above the horizon…whatever your latitude is, that's how high the North Star will be in the sky. If you're below the equator, say goodbye to Polaris.

JAMES: So we gain more stars in the southern sky when we head south and lose more of the northern sky.

DEAN: Wherever you watch the skies, remember to…

BOTH: Keep looking up!

STOP AND SALUTE

 

Episode #13-01 "The Changing Stars When You Head South Or North"
Air Dates January 7, 2013 - January 13, 2013



ONE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
JAMES: Your perspective on the sky changes when you travel north and south.

STOP AND DROP

DEAN: At around 39 degrees north latitude, like in Cincinnati, Washington D.C. or San Francisco, here is the night sky this week. Facing south there’s Orion the hunter with his snazzy belt of three stars.

JAMES: Down lower is Sirius the scorcher, brightest star in the sky. Sirius is the bright nose of Canis Major, the big dog of Orion

(STOP)

(DEAN WALKING DOWN THE GLOBE)

JAMES: When Dean comes from Cincinnati to Miami to film star gazers he's travelling down the curve of the earth. So when he heads south, he gets to see stars that were blocked by his southern horizon.

(STOP)

DEAN: At 26 degrees north latitude, like in Miami, here is the southern sky this week. Orion and Sirius are much higher in the sky.

JAMES: And there are all these new stars above the southern horizon including Canopus, the second brightest star in the sky.

DEAN: Wherever you watch the skies, remember to…

BOTH: Keep looking up!

STOP AND SALUTE

 

Star Gazers Home Page Back to WPBT2.org Miami Science Museum Kika Silva Pla Planetarium | Santa Fe College The Cincinnati Observatory Support Star Gazes with your donation