WPBT2's Star Gazers

Episode #13-03 "Meet the Orion Family"
Air Dates January 21, 2013 - January 27, 2013



FIVE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
DEAN: Hey there Star Gazers. I'm Dean Regas, astronomer for the Cincinnati Observatory.

MARLENE: And I'm Marlene hidalgo, science teacher in miami florida. Fellow star gazer, our eye in the sky, James Albury will join us to help you find your way around the heavens.

DEAN: This week we're going to focus on a group of winter constellations surrounding Orion the mighty hunter.

MARLENE: Often called the Orion family, these constellations have some of the brightest stars and most easily recognized star formations in the sky.

DEAN: Now, the ancients watched the sky the same way we watch TV. Get this, when they tuned into the winter stars, they saw a giant hunter with three stars for a belt being trampled by a bull with seven women on its back while two hunting dogs were chasing after a unicorn and a bunny rabbit down by the river.

MARLENE: Where?

DEAN: Let's show you.

(STOP AND DROP)

MARLENE: Okay, we've got our skies set for 9 p.m. looking south. The constellation Orion takes center stage with his seven bright stars. The Arabs called him the central one and he'll play the central role in our winter sky saga.

DEAN: The two brightest stars in Orion make a nice contrast. Bright blue Rigel marks his left foot while ruby red Betelgeuse shines in his armpit. The colors of the stars are an indicator of their temperature. A blue star like Rigel is hot - about 11,000 degrees Celsius on its surface while a red star like Betelgeuse is much cooler at about 3000 degrees Celsius.

MARLENE: Most of the stars in Orion are blue, including his trademark belt. Not only are the belt stars your cue that you've found Orion, they'll also point the way to several other constellations. Show us the way, James!

(STOP)

JAMES: First connect a line through the belt stars and keep going up and to the right. You'll pass just under a bright red star called Aldebaran. Look out because this is the menacing eye of Taurus the bull. Taurus has a small V shape of five stars for a face and two long horns…now if you continue past the V of Taurus you'll run smack dab into the best and brightest open star cluster in the northern sky. These are the Pleiades or seven sisters. The Pleiades look like a little cloud to the naked eye but upon second glance you might be able to make out 5 or 6 of the individual stars. In a good pair of binoculars, they are just awesome!

(STOP)

(CLOSE-UP WITH JAMES POINTING ON HOVERBOARD)

JAMES: Formed from the same nebula, the seven sisters are young hot stars burning the candle at both ends. These stars are so hot that they may only live millions of years as opposed to our sun which has a lifespan of about 10 billion years. But wait; there are more than seven of them! The cluster includes hundreds of stars, with only the five or six brightest visible to the naked eye.

(STOP)

(JUST DEAN AND MARLENE)

DEAN: In Greek mythology, Orion fell in love with the sisters - all seven of them. They fled his advances into the sky and now have a protector from Orion in the form of Taurus the bull. So the sisters are sitting pretty on the bull's back while Orion must fend off the charging beast.

MARLENE: When Orion asked the gods for help with the bull, they let him call up his two hunting dogs. This time let the belt stars point you down and to the left. When you keep going, you'll run into the brightest star in the sky, Sirius. Also known as the Dog Star, Sirius marks the nose of Canis Major, the big dog.

DEAN: From Sirius, look up higher and you'll find the little dog star, Procyon in Canis Minor. Aww, what a cute little puppy.

MARLENE: Unfortunately the two dogs aren’t helping Orion with the bull. They're too busy chasing after a unicorn…(the constellation Monoceros) and a bunny rabbit… (the constellation Lepus) by the banks of the cosmic river…(the constellation Eridanus).

(STOP)

DEAN: So, tonight after sunset, go to the heavenly movies and see a giant hunter…being trampled by a bull…with seven women on its back…while two hunting dogs…chase after a unicorn…and a bunny rabbit…down by the river.

MARLENE: Whew! This is the Orion family of constellations and they're the same stars our ancestors have marveled at for thousands of years. Orion is the key so let his belt stars guide your way and you'll be reading the sky like an ancient Greek in no time.

BOTH: Keep looking up!

SALUTE STOP

 

Episode #13-03 "Meet the Orion Family"
Air Dates January 21, 2013 - January 27, 2013



ONE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
DEAN: This week Orion's belt will lead you on a constellation tour of the winter sky.

JAMES: Let's show you!

(STOP AND DROP)

JAMES: When you look to the south tonight, you can't miss Orion and his snazzy belt of three stars.

DEAN: Orion is the central one of the winter sky.  Follow the belt up and to the right and, bull's eye, you'll pass just below the bright reddish star Aldebaran, the eye of Taurus the bull.  Keep going to discover the Pleiades, aka the seven sisters, Orion's forbidden loves who ride the bull's back. 

JAMES: When we zoom in on the sisters with binoculars check out the view!

DEAN: Beautiful!

(STOP)

JAMES: Shooting an arrow down and to the left of the belt stars will take you to Sirius the Dog Star, brightest star in the sky.  Above Sirius you'll find the little dog star, bright white Procyon.  These two stars are part of Orion's hunting dog Canis Major and Canis Minor.

DEAN: Respect the belt and let Orion show you the way.

BOTH: Keep looking up!

SALUTE STOP

 

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