WPBT2's Star Gazers

Episode #13-04 "Jumpin’ Jupiter!"
Air Dates January 28, 2013 - February 3, 2013



FIVE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
JAMES: Welcome to Star Gazers. I'm James Albury.

DEAN: And I'm Dean Regas,

MARLENE: and I'm Marlene Hidalgo.

JAMES: Hey Dean and Marlene. Which planet has over 300 times the mass of the earth, has more than 60 moons and is named after the king of the Roman gods?

DEAN: Would that be…

MARLENE & DEAN: Jupiter?

JAMES: Exactly!

MARLENE: And because Jupiter is in such a great location for viewing right now, we've devoted this episode to the largest planet in our solar system.

DEAN: Plus, we have an awesome collection of planetary pairings and a few moon-Jupiter scoochies to share. Let's show you!

(STOP AND DROP)

MARLENE: OK, we have our skies set for any night this week about an hour after sunset. If you look high in the south eastern sky, you'll see Jupiter near the stars of Taurus the bull. An easy way to find Taurus is to shoot an arrow from east to west through the 3 stars, which mark Orion's belt. This will bring you to the star Aldebaran, which marks the eye of Taurus.

JAMES: Aldebaran is joined by a v-shaped cluster of stars called the Hyades, which marks the face of Taurus, and Jupiter is just to the west of that. Jupiter is not only the largest planet in our solar system, but its gravity is so strong that it’s been referred to as the solar system's vacuum cleaner.

DEAN: That's right. Jupiter's gravity attracts nearby asteroids and other small solar system bodies, and it has been known to dramatically change the orbits of inbound comets, which can shorten or  lengthen the amount of time it takes for the comet to orbit the sun.

STOP FLY

MARLENE: In July 1994, fragments of comet shoemaker-levy 9 collided with Jupiter, providing the first direct observation of a collision between two solar system objects.

DEAN:  The planet Jupiter has been observed in the sky since antiquity. Babylonian astronomers have records of Jupiter dating back to the 7th century B.C. In his book the almagest, Greek astronomer Claudius Ptolemy used Jupiter's motion with respect to the earth to refine his earth-centered model of the solar system, showing that Jupiter took almost 12 years to make a complete circuit of the sky, which we now know as the amount of time it takes Jupiter to orbit the sun.

MARLENE: In 1610, Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei studied Jupiter using a telescope and is credited with discovering the four largest moons of Jupiter; Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. The motions of these moons around Jupiter provided Galileo with an example supporting Nicholas Copernicus' view of a sun-centered solar system, because if you look at Jupiter and its moons, they do look like a miniature version of our solar system.

JAMES: Astronomers Giovanni Cassini and Robert Hooke both noticed a large red spot on Jupiter during their telescopic observations in the 1660's. This spot, affectionately called the great red spot, is a giant storm, three times the diameter of the planet earth.

(STOP & DROP)

DEAN: Speaking of size, as planets go, Jupiter is enormous. If Jupiter were hollow, you could fit over 1000 earths inside it, and it has over 120 times the surface area of the earth. In more down to earth terms, if Jupiter were the size of a basketball, earth would be about the size of a small marble.

MARLENE: Jupiter also spins very fast. Of all the planets in the solar system, Jupiter has the shortest day, lasting only 9.8 hours. Which means that when Jupiter rises at sunset during the winter months (when the sky is dark for more than 12 hours), in the course of only one night, you can actually see the entire surface of the planet.

JAMES This rapid spinning has caused Jupiter to take on an m & m shape and because Jupiter is not a solid body, Jupiter's atmosphere actually spins faster at the equator than it does at the poles, making the clouds form the stripes we've come to know and love.

DEAN: OK, let's check out what the other planets are doing.

(STOP & DROP)

MARLENE: Shortly after sunset on Friday, February 8th, look toward the west and you'll see Mars and Mercury less than half a degree apart.

JAMES: And here's how the moon and Jupiter will appear on February 17th … then on St. Patrick's Day, march 17th, and then almost a month after that on April 14th.

DEAN: So, get outside and do some Jupiter gazing this week.

ALL: Keep looking up!

STOP AND SALUTE

 

JAMES: Jupiter is in such a great location for viewing right now, so we've devoted this episode to the largest planet in our solar system.

(STOP AND DROP)

MARLENE: OK, we have our skies set for any night this week about an hour after sunset. If you look high in the south eastern sky, you'll see Jupiter near the stars of Taurus the bull. Make sure you mark your calendars, because over the next few months, the moon will make some really close passes near Jupiter.

JAMES: Here’s how they'll appear shortly after sunset on February 17th …then a month later on St. Patrick's Day, March 17th, and then almost a month after that on April 14th.

MARLENE: And if you look toward the west shortly after sunset on Friday, February 8th, Mars and Mercury will be less than half a degree apart in the constellation of Aquarius.

JAMES: So get outside and do some planet watching this week.

BOTH: Keep looking up!

STOP AND SALUTE

 

Episode #13-04 "Jumpin’ Jupiter!"
Air Dates January 28, 2013 - February 3, 2013



ONE MINUTE EPISODE SCRIPT
JAMES: Jupiter is in such a great location for viewing right now, so we've devoted this episode to the largest planet in our solar system.

(STOP AND DROP)

MARLENE: OK, we have our skies set for any night this week about an hour after sunset. If you look high in the south eastern sky, you'll see Jupiter near the stars of Taurus the bull. Make sure you mark your calendars, because over the next few months, the moon will make some really close passes near Jupiter.

JAMES: Here’s how they'll appear shortly after sunset on February 17th …then a month later on St. Patrick's Day, March 17th, and then almost a month after that on April 14th.

MARLENE: And if you look toward the west shortly after sunset on Friday, February 8th, Mars and Mercury will be less than half a degree apart in the constellation of Aquarius.

JAMES: So get outside and do some planet watching this week.

BOTH: Keep looking up!

STOP AND SALUTE

 

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